Lexham Press to publish my Apostolic Fathers and Greek Apocryphal Gospels

It’s a long headline, but I’m not sure how to make it shorter. And it’s true; Lexham Press will be publishing my translation of the Apostolic Fathers and my introduction and translation of several Greek editions of Apocryphal gospels, manuscript fragments, and agrapha. They’re targeted for Fall 2017, which means they should be (fingers crossed!) on the tables at SBL in Boston along with other forthcoming Lexham Press titles.

I’m thrilled about this. My books are being published in the Lexham Classics series, which means my stuff is on the same page as works by Martin Luther, Louis Berkhof, and G.K. Chesterton. And the covers are pretty sweet too.

LexhamPressApostolicFathers-001

LexhamPressGreekApocGospels-001

These have been available for Logos Bible Software for while (see here and here), and they’ve been well received. When folks have asked me about print editions, I’ve had to direct elsewhere. Now I’m happy to finally be able to point to these Lexham Classics editions.

I’ll pass along more info when I have it. There are a bunch of other great books in the Fall 2017 Lexham Press Academic Catalog, so do give it a look.

SBL 2017 Paper: Sounding Biblical: The Use of Stock Phrases in Christian Apocrypha

As I mentioned a few weeks ago, my proposal for the open Christian Apocrypha session was accepted. I described it to a friend like this: “Hey, I snuck a corpus linguistics paper into the Christian Apocrypha section!”

Here’s the abstract for those interested:

There are certain phrases that, due to familiarity and usage, seem biblical upon hearing or reading them. That is, they sound like language used in the Bible. Phrases like “in the beginning,” “all the creeping things that creep,” and “truly, I say to you.” This paper uses a variation on what are known as n-grams to isolate stock phrases and explore their use and effect in apocryphal works. The First Apocryphal Apocalypse of John (1AAJn), which the author is presently researching for volume 2 of the “More New Testament Apocrypha” project, is used as a test case. The entirety of the Septuagint and Greek New Testament are used to identify five-word clusters of shared vocabulary that repeat with some frequency in biblical literature (“stock phrases”). 1AAJn is then compared to the biblical literature to locate possible stock phrase usage within 1AAJn. If time and space permit, Greek editions of other writings (Apocryphal Gospels, Apostolic Fathers, possibly some non-Christian writings) will also be evaluated at a high level to determine use or non-use of stock phrases in composition.

 

NT Apocrypha: The Second Apocalypse of John

Flammarion Woodcut, via Wikimedia Commons.

Yesterday I blogged about my introduction of and translation to John and the Robber, a nice and relatively unknown piece of Christian (New Testament) Apocrypha. I also mentioned Eerdmans’ New Testament Apocrypha: More Noncanonical Scriptures, Volume 1.

A volume 1 usually implies the intent of a volume 2 and that is the case with New Testament Apocrypha: More Noncanonical Scriptures. I’ve recently committed to write another piece for volume 2. This next one is a bit outside of my wheelhouse as it involves an apocryphal apocalypse, but I chose to do it anyway; largely because it was there and needed to be done. And, I think, it’ll be fun.

I’ll be writing an introduction and translation to The Apocalypse of Saint John the Theologian; which is also known as The Second Apocalypse of John and The Later Apocalypse of John.

Constantin Tischendorf

The Greek text is available in, of course, Tischendorf’s volume of apocryphal apocalypses. Did that guy ever sleep?

Constantiunus Tischendorf, Apocalypses Apocryphae: Mosis, Esdrae, Pauli, Iohannis, item Mariae Dormitio, additis evangeliorum et Actuum Apocryphorum Supplementis. Hermann Mendelssohn: Lipsiae, 1866. Pp. 70–94.

Edition also found in:

John M. Court, The Book of Revelation and the Johannine Apocalyptic Tradition. JSNTS 190. Sheffield Academic Press: Sheffield, England. 2000. Pp. 32–46.

Court reproduces Tischendorf’s edition, with his own translation on the facing page and notes.

Since I didn’t have a digital non-image edition of Tischendorf’s Greek text, I figured I’d key it in. It isn’t that long, so no biggie. It just took a few mornings. I started with Court’s edition of Tischendorf, as the diacritics were clearer in the print than my PDF of Tischendorf. Then I proofed against Tischendorf.

Now I’ll be able to do other stuff with the text as I begin to actually work on the text over the next weeks and months. You’re welcome.

Since you may not read Greek, here’s a translation from the Ante Nicene Fathers, volume 8. Of course I’ll do my own, but I haven’t started yet, and that one will be in the forthcoming volume 2 (so probably not released on the blog).

The full citation, if you’re interested:

Alexander Roberts, James Donaldson, and A. Cleveland Coxe, eds., Fathers of the Third and Fourth Centuries: The Twelve Patriarchs, Excerpts and Epistles, the Clementina, Apocrypha, Decretals, Memoirs of Edessa and Syriac Documents, Remains of the First Ages (vol. 8, pp. 582–586; The Ante-Nicene Fathers; Buffalo, NY: Christian Literature Company, 1886).

If you find this useful, interesting, or helpful, please let me know.

NT Apocrypha: John and the Robber

9780802872890I just realized that I have not mentioned this on the blog. But recently I wrote an introduction and translation for a neat piece of Christian (aka New Testament) Apocrypha known as John and the Robber. It is a great little apocryphal story of the apostle John, post-Patmos, in Ephesus and his encounter with the bishop of Smyrna and a robber.

This will be published in Tony Burke and Brent Landau’s forthcoming New Testament Apocrypha: More Noncanonical Scriptures (Volume 1), to be published in November 2016 by Eerdmans. So keep an eye out for it, the volume looks to be awesome.

Note: I mention this because a volume 2 is in the works, and I’ve recently been working on a submission. More later.